The extraordinary spaciousness of Amar’e Stoudemire’s South Florida mansion is perhaps unsurprising given that its current owner stands six foot ten inches tall. But now, someone else will have the chance to live under its soaring ceilings, because the former NBA star and six-time All-Star has put the ultraprivate 2.3-acre property on the market for $3.5 million.

With doorways that measure 10 feet in height, the home appears from the outside to have several levels, but in actuality, Stoudemire sought out the property more than a decade ago specifically because it’s a single-story home. “We just wanted a nice family-style home with no stairs,” his wife Alexis told Architectural Digest in 2017. “Basically a sanctuary for us to get away from everything.’

His asking price is slightly less than the $3.7 million he paid for in 2011. The grounds comprise a 7,361-square-foot main house with four bedrooms and five and a half bathrooms; a two-bedroom, one-bath guest house that measures 1,314 square feet; and a nine-car garage. A porte cochère provides a classy entrance into the main house.

AD toured the home in 2017.

Kris Tamburello

Inside, the aesthetic is larger-than-life: coffered ceilings and white marble floors, with floor-to-ceiling built-in wooden shelves in the two offices. The chef’s kitchen revolves around an oversize marble-topped center island. There is an indoor bar area with a pool table, and, of course, a home gym.

The main suite is massive, with a marble spa-style bathroom and impressive walk-in closet with a crystal chandelier as its centerpiece. A hidden home theater with patterned old-timey wallpaper is perfect for family movie nights. Out back, there is a waterfall spilling over into the irregularly shaped pool, a large outdoor kitchen with built-in grill, and a spacious deck for lounging. Stoudemire recalled to AD his reaction when he and his family first walked into the house. “My jaw touched the ground,” he said. “My chin dropped all the way to my Nikes — I had to pick it back up. It was an amazing feeling: we’re home.”

This post was originally published on Architectural Digest