TODAY IN HISTORY – Battle of THE WILDERNESS

Battle Of The Wilderness Facts
Location: Spotsylvania and Orange Counties, Virginia
Dates: May 5-7, 1864
Generals: Union: Lt. Gen Ulysses S. Grant | Confederate: General Robert E. Lee
Soldiers Engaged: Union: 102,000 | Confederate: 61,000
Outcome: Inconclusive
Casualties: Union: 18,400 | Confederate: 11,400

Battle Of The Wilderness Summary: The Battle of the Wilderness began Lt. … Read the rest

The False Equivalence of Liberia and Israel

It is frequently forgotten, but early Zionist thinkers consciously aligned their project with Black Liberation movements around the world. Theodore Herzl, writing in his utopian novel Alteneuland (Old-New-Land) of 1902, called for the ‘restoration of the Negroes’ to Africa under the principle that ‘all men should have a homeland.’ Other Zionists connected the indignities that Read the rest

How the Rush for Congo’s Cobalt is Killing Thousands

The Democratic Republic of Congo is currently facing a humanitarian crisis as miners are forced to work under exploitative conditions which amounts to modern-day slavery. The mining industry, because of its high demand, is host to various human rights violations including child labour.

20 December 2023, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) will head Read the rest

An Introduction to James Baldwin

James Arthur Baldwin (1924 – 1987) was born in Harlem, New York on August 2, 1924 to Emma Berdis Jones, originally from Deal Island, Maryland. He was reared by his mother and stepfather David Baldwin, a Baptist preacher, originally from New Orleans, Louisiana, whom Baldwin referred to as his father and whom he described as

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Today in History – Langston Hughes

Poet and writer Langston Hughes, famous for his elucidations of black American life in his poems, stories, autobiographies, and histories, was born in Joplin, Missouri, on February 1, 1901 or 1902.

Langston Hughes…. Photo by Jack Delano for the OWI, [1942]. Prints & Photographs Division

I’ve known rivers:
I’ve known rivers ancient as

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How University Expansion and Eminent Domain Led to Black Land Loss

In the 1960s, when Newport News, Virginia, remained a largely segregated city, longtime Black residents wanted to expand their neighborhood, offering former farmland as plots to other middle-class families looking to build homes.

The city had other plans. In a deliberate attempt to halt that growth, white city officials selected that same land as the … Read the rest